Big Planet

The art of book vandalism

In history, reblog on July 23, 2009 at 1:11 pm

Many centuries ago in China, shortly before the construction of the Great Wall, Emperor Qin commanded that all books must be destroyed. The only ones excluded were useful manuscripts, like books on astronomy and agriculture. Jorge L. Borges wrote that in order for the leader to truly establish himself as the first emperor of the unified kingdoms of China, he must first erase history. The emperor prevented the forces that shattered this unity, in turn hastening the construction of the structure. For imaginative purposes, one could think of the Wall as being made of books instead of bricks, since the burning of books was totally in conjunction with the project.

Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China, a most exemplary piece showing the so-called “Kafkaesque process of non-arrival” (see John Updike’s introduction to Franz Kafka: the Complete Short Stories), speculates how the Chinese citizens were socialized into the project by having the entire educational system revolve around the notion of “building”. The most important skills were related to constructing something indestructible, in the masonic sense of the word.

(There is a legend that Emperor Qin ordered some 500 Confucian scholars to be buried alive, in response to some illustrious people who opposed his tyrannical ways.)

Borges, the librarian of the world, pursued the idea that books constitute the substance of the universe in The Library of Babel. That was the extent of his bibliophilia. This fictional essay is the first Borgesian piece that I ever loved. What was most astonishing is how he calls attention to the physical constitution of the book rather than the text. For him, even the pages and the binding are sublime.

Today, contemporary artists have found a lot of uses from the physical constitution of books. The pictures are from OffBeatEarth:

Below are promotional images for Anagram Bookshop in Prague, by Kaspen.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: