Big Planet

Health care is not a right

In critique, philosophy, reblog on July 25, 2009 at 8:25 am

To make medicines and health services available to all citizens, care of the government — any sane person would think that this is moral and well-intentioned. People who oppose the health care plan in America reason out that while indeed it is moral and well-intentioned, it is impractical. As of this date, “the US spends more on health care than any other country” (Financial Times).

Dr. Leonard Peikoff, who is heir to Ayn Rand’s intellectual estate, says that the health care plan, or the concept of socialized medicine for that matter, is impractical because it is immoral. The opponents of the plan are therefore merely scratching the surface. Peikoff argues: Health Care Is Not A Right. The reason is as follows:

Now our only rights […] are the rights to life, liberty, property, and the pursuit of happiness. That’s all. […]

Why only these? Observe that all legitimate rights have one thing in common: they are rights to action, not to rewards from other people. The American rights impose no obligations on other people, merely the negative obligation to leave you alone. The system guarantees you the chance to work for what you want—not to be given it without effort by somebody else.

The right to life, e.g., does not mean that your neighbors have to feed and clothe you; it means you have the right to earn your food and clothes yourself, if necessary by a hard struggle, and that no one can forcibly stop your struggle for these things or steal them from you if and when you have achieved them. In other words: you have the right to act, and to keep the results of your actions, the products you make, to keep them or to trade them with others, if you wish. But you have no right to the actions or products of others, except on terms to which they voluntarily agree.

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