Big Planet

Vampires are good for the economy

In popular economics, reblog on July 25, 2009 at 4:46 pm

Just as I have thought. Vampires work wonders to the economy, if their population is managed effectively.

In Dennis Snower’s Macroeconomic Policy and the Optimal Destruction of Vampires (1982), the optimal production of stakes should make the supply sufficiently low to allow the regeneration of vampires (see my An economic policy on vampires post).

Michael Ian Black has some amateur arguments in My Custom Van. Ecocomics sums this up:

…vampires would be more likely to attack individuals of lower socioeconomic backgrounds, who have less adequate means of protecting against an attack. This, he argues, would serve to reduce spending on social welfare programs, such as Medicaid, since more lower-income individuals enroll in these programs.

The same blogger adds his own insights:

…there are other industries that have the potential to grow. One is, of course, the insurance industry. Much like with supernatural disaster insurance, people will want compensation in the event of vampires destroying their homes, their cars, and most of all, their pets. And what about insurance against actually becoming a vampire? Vampires have things to buy. They still live in homes, which means they have mortgages to pay, utilities bills, car insurance payments, etc. Unlike zombies, vampires do not just walk around lusting for brains and losing body parts. They are actually capable of blending in with humans, holding intelligent conversation, and engaging in rational thought. They are also capable of deriving enjoyment from television, music, books, clothing, and others. Therefore they are likely to make some purchases for entertainment and luxury in addition to necessity.

See the complete article here.

Related posts:
An economic policy on vampires

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